Book #36349
The Elements of the Common Laws of England, Branched into a Double. Sir Francis Bacon.
The Elements of the Common Laws of England, Branched into a Double...
The Elements of the Common Laws of England, Branched into a Double...
The Elements of the Common Laws of England, Branched into a Double...

The Elements of the Common Laws of England, Branched into a Double...

Bacon, Sir Francis. The Elements of the Common Laws of England, Branched into a Double Tract: The One Contayning A Collection of Some Principal Rules and Maxims of the Common Law, With Their Latitude and Extent. Explicated for the More Facile Introduction of Such as are Studiously Addicted to That Noble Profession. [With] The Other: The Use of the Common Law, for the Preservation of our Persons, Goods, and Good Names. According to the Laws and Customs of this Land. Originally published: London: Printed by the Assignes of I. More Esq., 1630. xix, 104, vii, 84 pp. Reprinted 2003, 2019 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN-13: 9781584772484; ISBN-10: 1584772484. Hardcover. New. $39.95 * The Elements of the Common Laws of England is the general title for a work that is comprised of two different treatises: A Collection of Some Principall Rules and Maximes of the Common Lawes of England and The Use of the Law, Provided for the Preservation of Our Persons, Goods and Good Names. The first contains a set of twenty-five maxims, or regulae. One of the earliest, if not first, collections of maxims on English law, it is remarkable for its stylistic vigor, intellectual rigor, meticulousness and clarity. The second treatise is a review of the history and practical application of criminal law, estate law, personal property law and the law of slander (i.e. "the preservation of our good names from shame and infamy"). The Use of the Law is probably not in fact by Bacon; it was first printed anonymously as Part II of The Lawyers Light (1629) by Sir John Doddridge. Among America's Founding Fathers, Jefferson held Bacon in high esteem. In a 1789 letter to John Trumbull, he said he considered Bacon, Locke and Newton to be "the three greatest men that have ever lived, without any exception." One of the great intellectuals of his era, Bacon [1561-1626] held the posts of Solicitor General, Attorney General and Lord Chancellor during the reign of James I.

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Book number 36349

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