Book #58456
Ad Jus Feudale Utrumque Germanicum et Longobardicum Introductio. Johann Schilter.

Ad Jus Feudale Utrumque Germanicum et Longobardicum Introductio...

By a Pioneering Scholar of Comparative Law And Legal History Schilter, Johann [1632-1705]. Ad Jus Feudale Utrumque Germanicum et Longobardicum Introductio seu Institutiones ex Genuinis Principiis Succincte Concinnatae, Et ad Fori Feudalis Hodierni Usum Directa. Strassburg: Sumptibus Jo. Friderici Spoor, 1695. [xvi], 108, [2] pp. Octavo (6-1/2" x 3-1/2"). Contemporary (or near-contemporary) three-quarter calf over marbled boards, gilt spine with raised bands and lettering piece. Wear to spine ends, corners bumped and lightly worn. Woodcut head-pieces, tail-pieces and decorated initials. Light browning, occasional light foxing. Early owner signature to front free endpaper, interior otherwise clean. $1,000. * First edition. Derived in part from Roman models but otherwise based on Germanic law, the Lombard Laws were introduced by the Lombard kings after their conquest of Italy in 568CE. It was a successful system that became more sophisticated during the following decades, especially after the union of the Lombards with the Frankish kingdom. This body of law was a decisive influence in Italian law and legal study into the seventeenth century and did not wholly disappear until the introduction of French-based codes in the nineteenth century. Schilter, a Ratskonsulent in Frankfurt and professor of law at the University of Strassburg, was a sophisticated jurist and a pioneering scholar of comparative law and legal history. The ground-breaking Ad Jus Feudale was one of the first modern studies of its kind. A standard work, it went through nine editions by 1750. OCLC locates 1 copy of the 1695 edition in a North American library (Harvard Law School). Stintzing/Landesberg, Geschichte der Deutschen Rechtswissenschaft III:1, n. 35.

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Book number 58456

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