Book #58949
The Lawiers Logike, Exemplifying the Praecepts of Logike by the. Abraham Fraunce, Steve Sheppard, New Introd.
The Lawiers Logike, Exemplifying the Praecepts of Logike by the...
The Lawiers Logike, Exemplifying the Praecepts of Logike by the...
The Lawiers Logike, Exemplifying the Praecepts of Logike by the...

The Lawiers Logike, Exemplifying the Praecepts of Logike by the...

Fraunce, Abraham. The Lawiers Logike, Exemplifying the Praecepts of Logike by the Practice of the Common Lawe. Originally published: London: William How, 1588. xxxvii (iii-xxvii new introduction), [xiv], [151] leaves (total 364 pp.). Reprinted by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2013. With a new introduction by Steve Sheppard, William Enfield Professor of Law, University of Arkansas School of Law. ISBN-13: 9781616192495; ISBN-10: 1616192496. Hardcover. New. $49.95 * In his introduction, Sheppard addresses longstanding academic speculation as to whether Shakespeare learned law from Fraunce. Written in 1588, The Lawiers Logike is the first legal treatise to apply the tools of logic to legal argument. This was a controversial and new concept at the time because its thesis contrasts with common law and its unmethodical and disorganized approach to law. Its influence is still felt. It is a unique work in which Fraunce castigates "lazy lawyers" and mixes illustrations from poetry and prose with often quite technical illustrations from law treatises and case reports. In his introduction, Steve Sheppard points out that this "work informs three fields of American law - the study of legal analysis and argument, the intersection of law with other disciplines, and the moral justification of law itself." (Introduction, iii). "Abraham Fraunce's The Lawiers Logike (1588) was the first attempt to theorise English law within a structure provided by humanist dialectic and rhetoric." -- Mark D. Walters, Cambridge Law Journal 67 (2008) 360 Abraham Fraunce [1559-1592?] attended St. John's College, Cambridge, enrolled in Gray's Inn in 1583 and was called to the bar in 1588, before Christopher Yelverton and Francis Bacon. In addition to his law practice, he was a noted poet, having been a classmate and protege of Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser's patron.

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Book number 58949

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