Book #64859
Put in His Thumb, TLS and Signed and Inscribed Card to Philip Jessup. Karl Nickerson Llewellyn, Philip Jessup.
Put in His Thumb, TLS and Signed and Inscribed Card to Philip Jessup.
Put in His Thumb, TLS and Signed and Inscribed Card to Philip Jessup.

Put in His Thumb, TLS and Signed and Inscribed Card to Philip Jessup.

With an Inscribed Presentation Card to Philip Jessup Llewellyn, K[arl] N[ickerson] [1893-1962]. Jessup, Philip [1897-1986]. Put in His Thumb. New York: The Century Company, [1931]. [x], 119 pp. Quarter cloth over speckled boards, black lettered title to front cover, deckle edges, most signatures unopened. Light shelfwear and soiling. Near-fine 5" x 3" presentation card inscribed to Philip Jessup and 8-1/2" x 11" mimeographed typescript presentation letter laid in. $500. * First edition, first printing. Collected poems of one of the leading American legal thinkers of the twentieth century. One of these is a tribute to Oliver Wendell Holmes. The presentation letter is in the manner of a press release. It says, in part: "I hope you like them. But if you don't, send them back and get a check. (...) One thing will interest you: the number of law-men whose letters showed, or shyly confessed, or brazenly announced interest in verse is such as to threaten the existing order. Some unsuspected and insidious propaganda has been poisoning the purer factuality of the profession. Unless something is done about it, and at once, verse-in-lawyers may become respectable." The part-printed laid-in card features a caricature of a naked Llewellyn (?) sitting cross-legged and gesturing to a motto: "Nothing endures, surely not these. But me they please - Now they are yours." Below this motto is an autograph inscription to Philip Jessup dated October 7, 1931: "To my friend Phil Jessup, these play-word jingglings, as a contrast to the serious ones of law." Jessup, a judge on the International Court of Justice, important legal scholar and U.S. diplomat, was credited with playing a major role in ending the Soviet blockade of West Berlin. He was a representative to the United Nations General Assembly, as well as a U.S. ambassador at large from 1949 until his resignation in 1953. Like Llewellyn, he was a professor of law at Columbia University.

Price: $500.00

Book number 64859