Book #67034
Decretum. 1493. Commentary by Bartholomaeus Brixiensis and Johannes. Corpus Juris Canonici, Gratian the Canonist.
Decretum. 1493. Commentary by Bartholomaeus Brixiensis and Johannes...
Decretum. 1493. Commentary by Bartholomaeus Brixiensis and Johannes...
Decretum. 1493. Commentary by Bartholomaeus Brixiensis and Johannes...
Decretum. 1493. Commentary by Bartholomaeus Brixiensis and Johannes...
Decretum. 1493. Commentary by Bartholomaeus Brixiensis and Johannes...

Decretum. 1493. Commentary by Bartholomaeus Brixiensis and Johannes...

Handsome Incunable Edition of Gratian Corpus Juris Canonici. Gratian the Canonist [c. 1090-c. 1160]. [Johannes Teutonicus (or Zeneka) (d.1253), Glossator]. [Bartolomeo da Brescia (d.1258), Glossator]. [Brant, Sebastian [1458-1521], Editor]. Decretum Gratiani. [Basel: Johann Froben, 13 June 1493]. [520] ff. Main text in parallel columns with linear gloss. Collation: a-z, ?8, A-Z8, AA-SS8. Signatures RR-SS replaced with signatures from the 1500 Froben edition. Added signatures aA-bB6 from the Froben edition of 1500 before main text (signature a), woodcut portrait of Gratian in duplicate, both hand-colored. Quarto 8-1/4" x 6" (21 x 15 cm). Contemporary calf with elaborate blind-tooling over wooden boards, title, brass bosses to corners and centers of boards, raised bands and small later shelf label to spine, "Decretu" blind-stamped to head of front board, 55" in early hand to fore-edge of text block, clasps lacking, pastedowns renewed. Moderate rubbing, chip to head of spine. 67-line text printed in red and black, occasional capitals spaces, mostly with guide-letter, 13-line illuminated initial N on a2r, supplied leaf Aa2 with illuminated initial and flourish at margin. Moderate toning, occasional faint dampstaining to margins, light soiling to a few leaves. $30,000. * The first of two Froben editions, a composite copy brought together c. 1500. The Decretum Gratiani, is the cornerstone of modern canon law. The first work of its kind, it was compiled by Gratian, a Camaldolese monk, around 1140. Using the latest scholastic and juristic techniques from Bologna, he attempted to harmonize these disparate texts. Like the Corpus Juris Civilis in the study of the civil law, it became the basic text for the study of canon law for many centuries. In the following century an extensive gloss was added by Teutonicus, a German prior living in Bologna. Known as the Glossa Ordinaria, it was later revised and enriched by another Bolognese prior, Bartholomew of Brescia. The gloss and its revisions become a standard feature of subsequent manuscripts and printings. Though never an official edition of canon law, it was a standard work for nearly 800 years until it was superseded in 1918 by the Code of Canon Law (Codex Iuris Canonici). Remembered today as the moral and satirical poet of Das Narrenschiff [The Ship.

Price: $30,000.00

Book number 67034