Book #70417
A New Institute of the Imperial or Civil Law, With Notes Shewing. Thomas Wood.
A New Institute of the Imperial or Civil Law, With Notes Shewing...
A New Institute of the Imperial or Civil Law, With Notes Shewing...
A New Institute of the Imperial or Civil Law, With Notes Shewing...

A New Institute of the Imperial or Civil Law, With Notes Shewing...

Civil Law for "Persons of Quality" [Wood, Thomas (1661-1722)]. A New Institute of the Imperial or Civil Law. With Notes, Shewing in Some Principal Cases, Amongst Other Observations, How the Canon Law, The Laws of England, And the Laws and Customs of Other Nations Differ From It. In Four Books. Composed For the Use of Some Persons of Quality. London: Printed by W.B. for Richard Sare, 1704. [iv], xvii, [7], 361, [11] pp. [Bound with] A Treatise of the First Principles of Laws in General: Of Their Nature and Design, And of the Interpretation of Them. Translated out of French. Being a Proper Introduction to the New Institute of the Imperial or Civil Law, With Notes, &c. Lately Published. London: Printed by W.B. for Richard Sare, 1705. [iv], 144 pp. Octavo (7-1/2" x 4-3/4"). Contemporary paneled speckled calf, rebacked in period style with raised bands, lettering piece and gilt ornaments, endpapers renewed. Light rubbing to boards, moderate rubbing to extremities, joints just starting at ends, corners bumped and lightly worn, hinges cracked. Moderate toning, early owner annotation to half-title of New Institute, minor loss to lower corners of Leaves F1 (pp.65-66) and I1 (pp.113-114) due to paper flaws with negligible loss to text. An attractive copy. $750. * New Institute: first edition; Treatise: only edition as an independent work. Wood's New Institute was a standard Anglo-American treatise during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and a well-thumbed reference for jurists who wished to apply an element of civilian learning to their work, such as Joseph Story. As the title suggests, it is not only a summary adapted to the needs of students, but also a pioneering essay in comparative law. Wood pays some attention as well to Roman law's influence on the historical development of English law. Indeed, he observes that "Fleta and Bracton would look very naked if every Roman lawyer should pluck away his feathers" (ix). The Treatise is concerned with the philosophy of Roman law. It is incorporated in the later editions of the New Institute, which were published in 1712, 1721 and 1730. English Short-Title Catalogue T112596, T112584.

Price: $750.00

Book number 70417

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