Book #70700
Constitutiones (Cum Apparatu Joannis Andreae), Nuremberg, 1482. Pope Clement V, Giovanni d'Andrea.
Constitutiones (Cum Apparatu Joannis Andreae), Nuremberg, 1482.
Constitutiones (Cum Apparatu Joannis Andreae), Nuremberg, 1482.
Constitutiones (Cum Apparatu Joannis Andreae), Nuremberg, 1482.
Constitutiones (Cum Apparatu Joannis Andreae), Nuremberg, 1482.
Constitutiones (Cum Apparatu Joannis Andreae), Nuremberg, 1482.

Constitutiones (Cum Apparatu Joannis Andreae), Nuremberg, 1482.

1482 Koberger Imprint of the Clementinae with a Handsome Watercolor Vignette of the Pope with Prelates and Jurists Clement V [1305-1314], Pope. d'Andrea, Giovanni, [c.1270-1348], Glosses. [Constitutiones (Cum Apparatu Joannis Andreae)]. [Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, 15 January 1482]. [59] of [60] ff. Text in parallel columns with linear gloss. Lacking initial blank leaf. Collation: (aA)9, B-G8, H2. Folio (13-1/4" x 9-1/4"; 34 x 24 cm). Nineteenth-century paper-covered boards, recent calf spine with lettering piece, endpapers renewed. Moderate rubbing to boards, heavier rubbing with wear to their edges and corners. Printed in 78-80 lines, text in gothic type, rubricated, large Lombard initials in red and blue, 9-line decorated initial I and early watercolor of the pope surrounded by prelates and jurists in space above incipit on aA2r. Moderate toning, light soiling to margins through most of volume, dampstaining in upper margins gradually darkening towards the end of text block, annotations to margins in early hand throughout, light edgewear to first leaf, a small chip to its fore-edges, small piece torn from blank outer margin of D3-4 and restored, F2 foxed, blank upper outer corner of last few leaves restored, annotation in later (18th-century?) hand below colophon. $12,500. * Attempts to codify the body of canon law began in earnest during the Carolingian Empire. These efforts reached fruition in 1151 with the completion of Gratian's Concordia Discordantium Canonum, or Decretum Gratiani, a watershed compilation that superseded earlier collections. The Liber Quinque Decretalium of Gregory IX followed in 1234. Published in 1298, the Liber Sextus Decretalium of Boniface VIII was the last great collection of the pre-Reformation era. John XXII added the final official collection, the Liber Septimus Decretalium, better known as the Constitutiones Clementis V, or Clementinae (1317). Three more texts were added later: the Extravagantes of John XXII (1325), the Extravagantes Communes of other popes to 1484 and the Appendix Pauli Lancellotti (1563). These texts, popularly known as the Corpus Juris Canonici, were revised in 1580-1582 to reflect changes ordered by the Council of Trent. In this form it remained in force until the enactment of.

Price: $12,500.00

Book number 70700

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