Book #71008
Decretum Gratiani Emendatum et Notationibus Illustratum una cum. Gratian the Canonist, Johannes Teutonicus.
Decretum Gratiani Emendatum et Notationibus Illustratum una cum...
Decretum Gratiani Emendatum et Notationibus Illustratum una cum...
Decretum Gratiani Emendatum et Notationibus Illustratum una cum...
Decretum Gratiani Emendatum et Notationibus Illustratum una cum...

Decretum Gratiani Emendatum et Notationibus Illustratum una cum...

Impressive Early Post-Tridentine Edition of Gratian Gratian, the Canonist [c.1090-c.1160]. [Johannes Teutonicus (d.1253), Glossator]. [Bartolomeo da Brescia (d.1258), Glossator]. [Bolognini, Lodovico (1446-1508), Editor]. Decretum Gratiani Emendatum et Notationibus Illustratum una cum Glossis. Cum Privilegio Gregorii XIII. Pont. Max. & Aliorum Principum. Permittente Sede Apostolica; Atque cum Populi Romani Licentia. Venice: [Apud Magnam Societatem una cum G. Ferrario H. Franzino], 1584. 79 pp., 2704 [i.e. 2694] cols., [115] pp. Single-column main text surrounded by glosses. Folio (10-1/4" x 7-1/2"). Contemporary vellum, later gilt title to spine, edges of text block colored green, ribbon marker. Light soiling and some spotting to binding, corners and spine ends bumped. Text printed throughout in red and black, large woodcut vignette of Pope Gregory XIII to title page. Moderate toning to text, occasional light browning and faint dampspotting, faint dampstaining to head of text block in a few places, early repairs to fore-edges of ff. b1-b7. An impressive volume. $1,500. * The Concordia Discordantia Canonum, or as it is better known, the Decretum Gratiani, is the cornerstone of modern canon law. The first work of its kind, it was compiled by Gratian, a Camaldolese monk, around 1140. Using the latest scholastic and juristic techniques from Corpus Juris Civilis in the study of the civil law, it became the basic text for the study of canon for many centuries. The Decretum Gratiani addresses various aspects of church jurisdiction, offenses and legal proceedings, as well as administrative issues like baptism, feast days, confirmation and the consecration of churches. In the following century an extensive gloss was added by Teutonicus. Known as the Glossa Ordinaria, it was later revised and enriched by another Bartolomeo of Brescia. The gloss and its revisions become a standard feature of subsequent manuscripts and printings. Though never an official edition of canon law, it was a standard work for nearly 800 years until it was superseded in 1918, along with the other books of the Corpus Juris Canonici, by the Codex Iuris Canonici. Our 1584 Venice edition incorporates the changes ordered in 1580-1582 by the council of revisers established by the Council of Trent (the.

Price: $1,500.00

Book number 71008