Book #71268
The Famous Hypothetical Question in the Trial of Harry K Thaw. Trial, William Travers Jerome, Francis P., Garvan.
The Famous Hypothetical Question in the Trial of Harry K Thaw...
The Famous Hypothetical Question in the Trial of Harry K Thaw...
The Famous Hypothetical Question in the Trial of Harry K Thaw...
The Famous Hypothetical Question in the Trial of Harry K Thaw...
The Famous Hypothetical Question in the Trial of Harry K Thaw...
The Famous Hypothetical Question in the Trial of Harry K Thaw...
The Famous Hypothetical Question in the Trial of Harry K Thaw...

The Famous Hypothetical Question in the Trial of Harry K Thaw...

An Insanity Defense Prevails in the Thaw's Trial for the Murder of Stanford White [Trial]. Thaw, Harry Kendall [1871-1947], Defendant. Jerome, William Travers [1859-1934], District Attorney. Francis P. Garvan [1875-1937], Assistant District Attorney The Famous Hypothetical Question in the Trial of Harry K. Thaw for the Murder of Stanford White. [New York]: Boehm & Rathbone, [1907]. [vii], 39 pp. Portrait frontispiece (of Evelyn Nesbit Thaw) with tissue overlay. Illustrated throughout with black-and-white and color images. Quarto (11" x 8"). Original reverse calf with yapp edges, gilt title panel to front board, top edge gilt, untrimmed fore and bottom-edges, marbled endpapers. Some wear to spine ends and cormers, small scuff near head of spine, gift inscription to title page, light toning to text, faint offsetting from color images in a few places. $2,500. * "Edition-De-Luxe" limited to 250 copies, this copy unnumbered and inscribed from the publisher Richard Boehm to "my friend Mrs. Allen-Somers." With marginal illustrations and facsimiles on every page. Presented as a lavishly-illustrated "Statement of the Facts," this work, written by the District Attorney, William Travers Jerome, and an Assistant District Attorney, Francis P. Garvan, uses court transcripts to form a narrative about Harry K. Thaw's murder of the great architect Stanford White and the subsequent trial. Henry K. Thaw, a millionaire with a history of mental instability, married Evelyn Nesbit, a young New York showgirl who had previously been involved with White. Plagued by jealousy, Thaw repeatedly beat and raped Nesbit in an attempt to erase any memory of the prior relationship. Then, in 1906, at a Madison Square Garden premiere, Thaw shot Stanford White three times at close range, without provocation. Thaw's lawyers offered an insanity defense. After the first jury was unable to reach a verdict, the second jury acquitted Thaw on the grounds of temporary insanity, making this case one of the most perplexing and controversial of the 20th century. As a sensational event involving a millionaire, a famous architect and a glamorous former showgirl, this case inspired countless contemporary newspaper articles, pamphlets and scandal sheets. It was also the subject of several subsequent studies and fictional works, such as the 1955 movie The Girl in.

Price: $2,500.00

Book number 71268